AKA Tonnerre De Feu…

BT_French1BT_French2BT_French3BT_French4BT_French5BT_French6The worldwide campaign for Blue Thunder yielded some interesting translations.  In Europe it would be known as Das Fliegende Auge (Germany) Sininen Salama (Finland) and Tuono Blu (Italy).  Go here for the full obscure list but for now we are hovering over France where it was known as Tonnerre De Feu.

This vintage set of 12 (second half to follow in next post) French 10×8 full colour lobby cards are among the sharpest examples I’ve seen and came undisturbed in their original brown exhibitors (Warner-Columbia Film) envelope.  To brand them cards is a stretch as they are actually no more than prints on the thinnest paper so have endured well over the last 30 or so years…

The Hollywood Collection…

BT_4 BT_1 BT_2 BT_3Join THE SPECIAL on a journey of pure nostalgia as we fondly look back at the age of VHS where it was not unusual to devote an entire cassette (plus packaging) to individual 47 minute TV episodes.

With the 11 episode series originally airing on the BBC in 1984, this collection (distributed in the UK by Parkfield Entertainment) was attractively presented but failed to make it beyond the four volumes shown above and quickly became shelf warmers in department stores.  None of this mattered to me, however, as my excitement was tangible having discovered the lot as a kid being pulled around BHS one rainy Saturday afternoon.

The content (besides having no commercials) went essentially unchanged save for a hastily and poorly inserted title card at the beginning of each episode.  While this dead format is easily dismissed now, with only one televised re-run on BRAVO in the ’90’s it would be over twenty years before the series would be seen again in any medium…

“Believable As The 11 O’Clock News…”

BT_AC_Cover1BT_AC_1aBT_AC_2aBT_AC_3aBT_AC_16aBT_AC_17aEnjoy what must surely be the most comprehensive of journals detailing how the plethora of special effects photography in Blue Thunder was achieved.  The series of fascinating articles from the May 1983 edition of American Cinematographer magazine will be posted here in its entirety beginning with the overview above (click for larger images) by Robert Veze and concluding with a piece on Motion Control.  Catch ‘ya later..!